Driver of Change, live from the Dutch Design Week

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Radio 4 Brainport at work in Strijp-T building TQ6, at the Drivers of Change exhibition of the Eindhoven University of Technology,

In our Health episode, guests of our moderator prof. Jean-Paul Linnartz were prof. Carlijn Bouten and PhD candidate Bart Tiemeijer from the dept. of Biomedical Engineering, and Guid Oei, part-time professor at TU/e and gynaecologist at Maxima Medisch Centrum.
You can now also listen to the podcast of Tuesday’s program about Health at https://www.patreon.com/posts/ddw-2019-drivers-31003359

Or, in the AI episode, Jean-Paul Linnartz welcomes Maarten Steinbuch, Professor in Systems and Control, Carlo van de Weijer, head of the Strategic Area Smart Mobility, Vincent Müller, Professor Industrial Engineering & Innovation Sciences, and team Tech United, the world champions robot soccer from the Eindhoven University of Technology, to discuss Artificial Intelligence.

Also on 828 kHz AM

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Our mediumwave signal on 747 was poor in the Northern part of Eindhoven. Reception is now greatly improved as Radio Nederwetten relays our program during the day. So try 747 or 828 to listen in your car. The antenna location in Nederwetten allows a much more effective radiation of the radio signal//.

The aerodynamics of cycling: faster descents

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Scientific research that is being quoted over and over again? Prof. Bert Blocken’s insights on how win seconds in a cycling race, how to descent faster or on what position to take in a platoon have a profound impact of the big tours and races. Radio 4 Brainport visited this unique research facility at TU Eindhoven.

listen to our podcast Cyclists win by training in a windtunnel

Forecasting the Air Quality in every City Street?

Predicting turbulent air flows is hard. Eindhoven University of Technology has a unique wind tunnel that can experimentally simulate air flows. Although these new aerodynamic insights in cycling sport have been covered widely in the media, the insights on wind forces, on the spread of pollution, such as particulate matter (fijnstof) are also of high societal relevance. Radio 4 Brainport asked Prof. Bert Blocken to elaborate on what we can learn from wind tunnel experiments.

Podcast: Air Quality

Solar Team Builds a new Stella

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For the first team this year the Solar Team will be able to build in a new solar racing car fully under their own control.

Solar Team Eindhoven has kicked off the production process for the fourth edition in its series of solar-powered family vehicles. A notable change since the project started seven years ago is that the entire creation process will take place in Eindhoven: most of the design is based at the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and the manufacturing will be on the Brainport Industries Campus (BIC). The current team, consisting of 26 students from the TU/e working full-time on the project, will compete in the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge in Australia, on 13-20 October 2019.
“This time everything is coming together here in the Brainport region, with all of our partners. And, here at the BIC, we are working to develop as many partnerships as possible, to ensure that we make this ecosystem work”, says Evan Quadvlieg, Technical Acquisition Manager at Solar Team Eindhoven.

Listen to the interviews by Erika van Merwe on Radio 4 Brainport or visit IO.

IO Peak Awards, hear it all on Radio 4 Brainport

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During the first three editions, he was the chairman of the jury, this year Staf Depla is the big winner of the High Tech Piek Event that Innovation Origins organizes every year around Christmas. Depla, alderman for Economic Affairs in Eindhoven until last Spring, received the award for his efforts around the Brainport Action Agenda, which has helped the Brainport Eindhoven region move forward in the Netherlands as well as abroad. Previous Peaks have been awarded before to Guus Frericks (2015), Rob van Gijzel (2016) and Maarten Steinbuch (2017).

The STARs of 2018, awarded for performance in the past year, are John Blankendael, BIC, Carlijn Bouten, TU/e Professor of Biomedical Technology, Saartje Janssen, director Summa, and Jean-Paul van Oijen, Twice

The KNALLERs 2018, thus people of whom a lot is expected in 2019 are Lex Hoefsloot, Lightyear, Jalila Essaidi, BioArt Laboratories Max Aerts, Dutch Energy Solutions, Ineke Hurkmans, IamNL.

You will hear the all on Radio 4 Brainport

AI helps to visualize Cyber Attacks

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Does artificial intelligence solve problems? “Well, that depends whom you ask,” says data visualisation expert Prof Jack (Jarke) van Wijk, from Eindhoven University of Technology.

Data visualisation expert Jack van Wijk is at the forefront of several new developments in data sciences, which he oversees both as professor at the Technical University of Eindhoven, and as Director of the Data Science Centre Eindhoven. He was one of the speakers at the Holst Memorial Symposium 2018, where Radio4Brainport asked him about his views on the relative contributions of artificial intelligence versus data sciences. We began by asking him about the activities at the Data Science Centre.

Facebook’s head of AI: open innovation accelerates scientific progress

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Yann LeCun delivers Holst Memorial Lecture, says open innovation is route to faster scientific progress
Yann LeCun, head of Facebook’s Artificial Intelligence Research Group (FAIR), and considered one of the doyens of AI, delivered this year’s Holst Lecture, as the recipient of the 2018 Holst Medal. The annual award is hosted by Philips, Signify and TU/e, and is in honour of the significant contribution to research made by Dr Gilles Holst, director of Philips’ NatLab from 1914 to 1946.

Erika van der Merwe and Jean-Paul Linnartz covered the event for Radio 4 Brainport
On InnovationOrigins.com, Erika wrote about this event, the following, but you can listen to our podcast on

https://www.patreon.com/posts/23034773

LeCun, who in 2013 was asked by Mark Zuckerberg to drive Facebook’s AI research programme, is a strong proponent of open innovation and multi-disciplinary research, much in the spirit of the approach taken by Dr Holst. He is known for his work in machine learning, computer vision, mobile robotics, and computational neuroscience., and developed handwriting recognition technology used by many banks worldwide, and for his image compression technology, DjVu, used extensively to access scanned documents online. His convolutional neural network model is used in image recognition by companies such as Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Baidu.

Having flown in overnight from his New York base, and dressed in the casual elegance more reminiscent of his Silicon-valley employer than of his engineering and academic profession, LeCun addressed students, academics and industry-based researchers in the TU/e Auditorium in Eindhoven. Along with an overview of the history of AI, he outlined some of the research questions that FAIR is addressing today, as well as some of the features that AI simply cannot provide yet, given the current state of science. What we are still missing are machines with common sense, intelligent personal assistants, smart chatbots and household robots.

The reason why this is not yet possible, he says, is that machines do not yet have the ability to reason, nor can they react by planning suitable action. “For that, machines need a model of the world”.

The FAIR team, which has around 200 members worldwide, publishes all of its work, in the form of papers and source code, in the public domain. LeCun says this is in the interest of speeding up scientific innovation in AI. “The reason why we do this, is that we get people to use our tools, and we get people to improve on our method, so that it becomes much easier for us to move faster, essentially. We need to make progress faster”.

Wijnand IJsselstijn, a professor at the TU/e and chair of the 2018 Holst Memorial Committee, described the selection process to Radio4Bainport: “The award is a great honour bestowed upon scientists who do relevant work in the areas of technology, that are relevant to Philips, Signify and TU/e. We make a shortlist of scientists based on the relevance of the research generated and on the impact on people, in the environment that is relevant to the topic. This year the topic was AI and data science”.

IJsselstijn says some of the distinguishing aspects of LeCun’s work include his multi-disciplinarity. “This to me is a big appeal of his work. Also there is great practical significance to his work: Much of what he does is immediately applied to machine learning and image recognition, and to compression algorithms. He has an amazing track record in this area. All of that together makes him a very good candidate for the Holst Medal.”

LeCun, who maintains strong ties with academia through his professorship at New York University, has several ambitions for scientific developments in AI, including discovering whether self-supervised learning – which he believes will be the future of AI – can lead to common sense. As he put it, “a robot has less common sense than a house cat”.

One of his ambitions for the scientific future of AI is to develop a theory that could explain the underlying mechanisms of intelligence, whether human or machine intelligence. Describing this as equivalent to developing the theory of thermodynamics after the steam engine was built, he says that, “in the history of science and technology, it is very much the case that the artefact was created before the science was created to explain how it works. In fact, the science was motivated by the fact that the artefact already existed. Now, what is the equivalence of thermodynamics for intelligence? That is the question that I am after”.

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